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EFSA: Poultry welfare at slaughter: hazards identified and measures proposed

Animal WelfarePoultry

Recently EFSA has proposed measures to address the animal welfare hazards most commonly observed during the slaughter of poultry for food production and disease control. A comprehensive overview covers the entire slaughter process from arrival and unloading of birds through stunning to bleeding and killing. It identifies a number of hazards that give rise to welfare issues – such as pain, thirst, hunger or restricted movement – and proposes preventive and corrective measures where possible. Most of the hazards are the result of staff failings e.g. lack of training and skilled personnel. EFSA’s advice highlights the importance of staff being adequately trained in the different phases of slaughter and for clear identification of roles and responsibilities.

The new scientific opinions are the first in a series of updates on welfare of animals at slaughter requested by the European Commission. EFSA will publish further opinions in 2020 on pigs (March), cattle (June), and other species (December).

The reports are available at:

https://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/pub/5849

https://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/pub/5850

ERANET_logo_new

ERA-NET SUSAN: INITIAL PROJECTS SEMINAR

Animal Management and HousingAnimal WelfareEpidemiologyInfrastructure and ForesightLivestock Sectors

The ERA-NET Sustainable Animal Production (SusAn) had its Kick-off meeting in December and has launched the first call for transnational research proposals on January 4th, 2016. The funding organisations (37 partners of 22 MS) agreed that future development of the European Animal Production sector will need to build on the sustainability triangle of economic competitiveness, social acceptability and environmental protection.The co-funded call for research, open to transnational research proposals which take a systems and interdisciplinary approach to research to address multiple objectives under the three Research Areas of Economy, Environment and Society. the initial project seminar will be held in Bilbao,Spain November the 23rd-24th 2017.

efsa

EFSA panel renewal 2018: animal health and welfare

Animal HealthAnimal WelfareEpidemiology

The Panel on Animal Health and Welfare (AHAW) provides scientific advice on all aspects of animal diseases and animal welfare. Its work chiefly concerns food producing animals, including fish.

AHAW Panel Members are scientists from across Europe with expertise in:

Risk assessment, quantitative risk assessment, modelling
Microbiology and pathology (applied to infectious diseases of food-producing animals, including aquatic animals)
Epidemiology
Animal welfare
Animal production (husbandry, housing and management, animal transport and stunning and killing of animals)
Panel members

Register now on EFSA’s website www.efsa.europa.eu/ and prepare your application in advance so that you can submit it between 1 June and 8 September 2017.

EFSA

Urgent advise on Lumpy Skin Disease

Animal HealthAnimal WelfareBeef CattleLivestock SectorsSmall Ruminants

Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is a viral disease of cattle caused by a capripoxvirus (as sheep and goat pox viruses); it is characterised by fever, nodules on the skin, and it may lead to severe losses, especially in naive animals. Originally affecting cattle across Africa, the disease has spread outside the continent with outbreaks in Israel and Lebanon in 2012–2013 and currently (2013–2016) epizootics in Turkey, Cyprus, Greece, Bulgaria, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Serbia, Kosovo, Azerbaijan, Albania and the Russian Federation are reported.

To control the current LSD epidemic in the European Union (EU), the competent authorities of the affected Member States (MS) are currently implementing a total stamping-out policy of the affected holdings (stamping out the whole herd after detection of an infected case) coupled with vaccination using live homologous vaccines since there is consensus that stamping out alone does not seem sufficient to effectively control the disease, in line with the advice provided in the 2015 EFSA’s scientific opinion.

In accordance with Article 29 of Regulation (EC) No 178/2002, the Commission asks the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA): to assess the implications in disease spread and persistence from the implementation of a partial stamping-out policy (killing and destruction of clinically affected animals only) in holdings where the presence of LSD has been confirmed, against the current EFSA’s advice and policy in place for total stamping out of infected herds coupled with vaccination.

Due to the fast spread of LSDV throughout south-eastern Europe, it appears particularly important to provide insights into the effect of vaccinating susceptible animals before the virus has been introduced in a region or country on the spread of LSDV.

The complete article  with the outcomes of the study was published on August the 9th and is available at

http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/pub/4573